02 August 2013

Under and over earth

Gálgahraun.
One of the more frequent words in Icelandic landscape-names is "hraun", and when not being actively ignorant, one soon learns that this means "lava".
Where the gallow comes in, I have not found out yet, but Gálgahraun is one of the few unexploited areas of its kind close to the capital.
Plans have been made to build a a highway across it to the area where the president resident lies, but environmentalists and others have protested.

One of the more odd arguments against this road, is a "seer" who says that there are "elf-churces" in this area, and that it will unfortunate to disturb these hidden people. We should respect their sites and especially not destroy their sacred hills.

I walked into the area one night, but neither saw or in other ways sensed anything from below the ground. Over me however, in the air, lots of winged creatures squeaked and agressively chased me till I was out of the area again.

Álfhólsveg 102 - Álfhóll (means elf hill), is an elf-dwelling.
(The person on the bike is not an elf, well - I really didn't ask him - maybe his name is Álfur.)

In respect for the elves, the road is narrowed and the hill will not be re-regulated and used for anything else.

The sign explains that the Álfhóll is the most famous dwelling for elves in Kopavog, and that that some believe that here live one old and two young elves (It does not say what old and young means for elves), but earlier there were several more elves living in it.

Kopavogur church
at the opposite end of the road.

From here is a magnificent view over the bay from Reykjavik to Keflavik.